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Browse Items (32 total)

  • Tags: typewriter

April 20, 1892

Mary Leslie Newton discusses her sewing, mailing several magazines to her father, rent, and her father's stamp catalogue. She mentions wanting a teaching job. She concludes with the story of a strange cat that appeared and killed two of their…


April 17, 1892

Mary Leslie Newton provides an account of an explosion that took place in Xenia and claimed at least one life. She mentions the Easter sermon, and a humorous postscript mentions a "dangerous" book that she worries may end her association with a new…


March 30, 1892

Mary Leslie Newton writes a two-part letter to her father detailing the weather, her attendance at a Presbyterian club with her brother Don, Halley's health, and problems with the typewriter. She signs the letter "Dorothy."


March 21, 1892

Mary Leslie Newton provides brief commentary on the poor shape the typewriter is in, the process of moving, her teeth, and leading the Epworth League meeting.


February 24, 1892

Mary Leslie Newton describes the family's recent activities, including an encounter with a "good looking" young man at the coal office. Several postscripts are written vertically along the sides of the pages.


February 23, 1892

Another brief letter notes that Harper's and The Atlantic will be sent off to her father. Mary Leslie Newton provides a brief update on her sister's health



February 19, 1892

Mary Leslie Newton misdates her typewritten letter and points out the error. She notes that her father has not commented yet on the family publication, The Round Table. She describes a variety of social calls and her resumed drawing lessons.


January 26, 1892

Mary Leslie Newton describes her ongoing difficulty getting shoes on, and her decision to go to a revival meeting, Epworth League, and Lal Bagh regardless. Halley heard footsteps outside the house. The family all participated in the creation of a…


January 5, 1892

Mary Leslie Newton writes a humorous letter to her father, making up details to supplant the lack of news. She describes her own printing responsibilities, and asks if she might "set up as a boy" once her brother Don leaves home.